Health benefits

A number of potential health benefits of consuming chillies in various forms have been demonstrated. Clinical trials suggest capsaicinoids have anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Active compounds from capsicum species has been approved for various preparations for alleviation of pain from rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, psoriasis, shingles and nerve pain due to diabetes when applied to the skin in the affected area. Apart from various pharmacological benefits Capsaicin is potentially effective against various types of pains and some skin diseases. Clinical studies have demonstrated that the capsaiciniods play an important role in weight management namely energy expenditure, lipid oxidation and appetite. Clinical evidences suggest that capsaicinoids compounds could play a beneficial role in weight management. Increasing a person’s energy expenditure, lipid oxidation and reducing their appetite could be of great assistance in helping and maintaining weight loss.

Energy Expenditure: Supplementation of capsaicinoids have shown to increase energy expenditure, metabolic rate, increase in body temperature and increase in oxygen consumption. Therefore it is an important component for sports nutrition.

Duration, dose and diet

Key Findings

References

Single meal containing Capsaicinoid rich red pepper 30 mg/day

Increase in energy expenditure (EE) for 30 minutes (significance not stated).

Yoshioka et al 1995

Single meal containing Capsaicinoid rich red pepper 30 mg/day

Increase in EE (p < 0.05) for 180 minutes.

Yoshioka et al 1998

Single meal containing capsaicinoid (3 mg/day)

Significant increase seen in lean (p < 0.01) but not obese group.

Matsumoto et al 2000

Single meal containing CH-19 Sweet pepper at a dose of 0.03-0.1 per kg of bodyweight

Significant increase seen in lean (p < 0.01) but not obese group.

Ohnuki et al 2001

Capsaicin supplement for 4 months (135 mg/Day)

Significant increase in resting energy expenditure (p < 0.005).

Lejeune et al 2003

Capsaicin supplement for 4 weeks (3 and 10 mg/Day)

Dose responsive increase in EE (not significant).

Inoue et al 2007

Single meal with Capsinoid supplement of 10 mg/Day

Increases in EE (p < 0.05).

Josse et al 2010

Lipid Thermogenesis: Supplementation of capsaicinoids on lipid oxidation and adipose tissue has been demonstrated. Increased lipid oxidation recorded by measuring respiratory gases or a decrease in fat stores has been proven clinically. A decrease upto 20% in abdominal fat has been shown with the consumption of capsaicinoids.

Duration, dose and diet

Key Findings

References

Single meal containing Capsaicinoid rich red pepper 30 mg/day

Increase in lipid oxidation (p < 0.05) for 180 mins.

Yoshioka et al 1998

Capsaicin supplement for 4 months (135 mg/Day)

Lipid oxidation increase (p < 0.05), No significant effect on weight.

Lejeune et al 2003

Capsaicin supplement for 4 weeks (3 and 10 mg/Day)

Increased lipid oxidation (p < 0.05), significance only reached in group with BMI > 25.

Inoue et al 2007

Single meal with Capsinoid supplement of 10 mg/Day

Increases lipid oxidation, decrease in blood free fatty acids and glycerol (all p < 0.05).

Josse et al 2010

Appetite: Reductions in energy intakes has been shown with the consumption of capsaicin containing foods. A study showed that the capsaicin containing breakfast significantly reduced participants rating of their hunger and their desire to eat before lunch.

Duration, dose and diet

Key Findings

References

Single meal containing Capsaicin rich red pepper (30 mg/day)

Decrease in ad libitum energy intakes (p < 0.05).

Yoshioka et al 1999

Capsaicin supplement or drink (2.25 mg/day)

Decrease in energy intake (p < 0.01), increase in satiety (p < 0.01).

Westerterp-Platenga et al 2005

Variable consumption of cayenne Red Pepper for non-consecutive 6 days

Desire to eat and pre-occupation with food reduced. Desensitisation may occur with regular use.

Ludy & Mattes 2011

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